Trafficking in Persons Report 2017

On June 27, U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson released the 2017 Trafficking in Persons Report, under the theme “Enhancing Criminal Accountability and Addressing Challenges in Prosecution Efforts.” The 2017 TIP Report includes narratives for 187 countries and territories, including the United States. The goal of the report is to stimulate action and create partnerships around the world in the fight against modern slavery.

“Human trafficking is one of the most tragic human rights issues of our time. It splinters families, distorts global markets, undermines the rule of law, and spurs other transnational criminal activity. It threatens public safety and national security.

“But worst of all, the crime robs human beings of their freedom and their dignity. That’s why we must pursue an end to the scourge of human trafficking.

“Today we take another key step towards that goal. The 2017 Trafficking in Persons Report highlights the successes achieved and the remaining challenges before us on this important global issue.” – Rex W. Tillerson, Secretary of State

NIGERIA: Tier 2 Watch list

The Government of Nigeria does not fully meet the minimum standards for the elimination of trafficking; however, it is making significant efforts to do so. The government demonstrated significant efforts during the reporting period by investigating, prosecuting, and convicting traffickers; conducting anti-trafficking training for law enforcement officials; and repatriating some Nigerian trafficking victims identified abroad. However, the government did not demonstrate increasing efforts compared to the previous reporting period. During the reporting period, credible observers reported for the first time that some elements of the Nigerian security forces (NSF) used children as young as 12 years old in support roles, and NSF continued to detain and arrest children for alleged association with Boko Haram, some of whom may have been forcibly recruited. The Nigerian military also conducted on the ground coordination with the Civilian Joint Taskforce (CJTF), non-governmental self-defense militias that continued to recruit and use children—possibly unwillingly and mostly in support roles—and at least one of which received state government funding. Government officials—including military, police, and federal and state officials—were involved in widespread sexual exploitation of Borno State women and girls displaced by Boko Haram, at times forcing women and girls in IDP camps to provide commercial sex acts in exchange for food. Furthermore, despite identifying a large number of labor trafficking victims, the government only convicted two labor traffickers and it decreased funding for the National Agency for the Prohibition of Trafficking in Persons and Other Related Matters (NAPTIP), including its budget for victim services. Therefore, Nigeria was downgraded to Tier 2 Watch List.

Nigeria’s TIP report can be viewed at https://www.state.gov/j/tip/rls/tiprpt/countries/2017/271255.htm
All TIP reports can be viewed at https://www.state.gov/j/tip/rls/tiprpt/2017/index.htm.
Learn more about efforts to end trafficking in persons at https://www.state.gov/j/tip/.